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Speaker profile: Amy Shapiro

The WFH 2018 World Congress will feature speakers who will discuss important—and cutting edge—topics facing the bleeding disorders community today. In the lead-up to Congress, Hemophilia World Online will be profiling several prominent speakers who will be presenting this May. Today, we look at Amy Shapiro, MD.

Name: Amy Shapiro

Country: U.S.A

Talk: Optimizing bleed prevention: womb to tomb

Summary:

The focus of hemophilia care providers, patients and families is the ability to tailor care for patients across their lifespan. Tailored care requires a knowledge of the bleeding disorder and its age-related complications, the risk of therapeutic interventions, and the evaluation of the characteristics that contribute to the individual’s particular condition. Over the last decade, substantial therapeutic advances have been achieved in the treatment of hemophilia. These advances include the development of a robust array of factor concentrates, novel hemostatic agents, and increased knowledge and awareness of disease associated outcomes and risk factors. This talk will look at how all of these developments and a “womb to tomb” treatment philosophy can be brought together in order to maximize the quality of life of patients.

About the speaker: Amy Shapiro, MD, is Medical Director of the Indiana Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center in Indianapolis and Adjunct Professor of Pediatrics at Michigan State University in East Lansing. She is the author or co-author of more than 300 journal articles, abstracts and textbook chapters. Shapiro is clinically focused on improving treatment for people with rare bleeding disorders and has served on the National Hemophilia Foundation’s Medical and Scientific Advisory Council. Shapiro is one of the founders of the American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network (ATHN) and has served as Co-Chairman of the Board of Directors. She remains active on various ATHN committees.

Shapiro will be presented with the “Arosenius Fund Award” partner award during her plenary. The award—launched by the Swedish Hemophilia Society and named after the Swedish author and painter Ivar Arosenius who died at the age of 31 from a hemophilic bleeding—supports education and research in the field of hemophilia and gene therapy.

To find out more about other speakers who will be at the WFH 2018 World Congress, please visit the Congress program page.