WFH NETWORK

Training provides tools to support women with inherited bleeding disorders

In Algeria—the largest country in Africa—the World Federation of Hemophilia (WFH) and the Algerian National Hemophilia Association are working hard to improve the care and treatment of women with bleeding disorders. As per the 2017 WFH Annual Global Survey, 320 patients are currently diagnosed with von Willebrand disease (VWD) in that country. On October 29 to 30, in Algiers, a training workshop was held for health care professionals—including pediatric and adult hematologists, gynecologists, lab technicians, and ministry of health representatives—in order to give them the tools they need to better support the accurate diagnosis and proper care of women with bleeding disorders.

Participants came from all over the country to acquire new knowledge and to share best practices. During the two-day event, there was much exchange on the clinical management of different conditions. Many topics were covered, such as treatment options, the organization of care delivery for patients, and ways of identifying and referring women and girls who are suspected of having VWD or another condition.

Latifa Lamhene, President, Algerian National Hemophilia Association

“Coagulation disorders in women are a major concern for our association. Many women suffer from bleeding disorders but have never been diagnosed because of a lack of knowledge of the disease by the person themselves, by the family, and sometimes even by medical professionals. These situations can lead to feelings of isolation, to suffering, and sometimes can even lead to death.”

In Algeria—the largest country in Africa—the World Federation of Hemophilia (WFH) and the Algerian National Hemophilia Association are working hard to improve the care and treatment of women with bleeding disorders. As per the 2017 WFH Annual Global Survey, 320 patients are currently diagnosed with von Willebrand disease (VWD) in that country. On October 29 to 30, in Algiers, a training workshop was held for health care professionals—including pediatric and adult hematologists, gynecologists, lab technicians, and ministry of health representatives—in order to give them the tools they need to better support the accurate diagnosis and proper care of women with bleeding disorders.

Participants came from all over the country to acquire new knowledge and to share best practices. During the two-day event, there was much exchange on the clinical management of different conditions. Many topics were covered, such as treatment options, the organization of care delivery for patients, and ways of identifying and referring women and girls who are suspected of having VWD or another condition.