WFH NETWORK

Millions of people benefit from WFH Humanitarian Aid

In developing countries, the cost of treatment for people with bleeding disorders can be prohibitively expensive. The WFH has been a leader in humanitarian aid efforts to help ensure consistent and predictable access to treatment for millions of people around the globe. 

In developing countries, the cost of treatment for people with bleeding disorders can be prohibitively expensive. The WFH has been a leader in humanitarian aid efforts to help ensure consistent and predictable access to treatment for millions of people around the globe.

Since the Humanitarian Aid program was created in 1996, the WFH has distributed more than 322 million international units of clotting factor to 90 countries—helping more than 100,000 people. In 2015 alone, the Humanitarian Aid program donated nearly 53 million IUs of factor to people in 63 countries.

During the Monday morning session “WFH Humanitarian Aid: Treatment for All is the Vision for All,” speakers will discuss the evolving global needs for basic care for bleeding disorders and how the WFH addresses those needs.

Assad Haffar, the WFH director of humanitarian aid and four panelists will discuss details of the WFH program. Megan Adediran, Haemophilia Foundation of Nigeria, will focus on the WFH Cornerstone Initiative, which provides support, expertise and training to countries with minimal levels of care for people with bleeding disorders.

Thomas Sannie, French Association of Hemophilia, will highlight the Franco-African Alliance for the Treatment of Hemophilia (AFATH), which helps bring WFH Humanitarian Aid initiatives to hemophilia patients in 18 countries in sub-Saharan Francophone Africa.

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